DX on mobile CW

Tuesday was a great day for mobile CW. On the drive into work I had a long chat with Marty, K1WC, in northern Maine. I’ve talked to Marty a few times and he has a great fist — that means he sends good code — and he’s a good conversationalist on CW. We talked for about 40 minutes of my drive in and then I turned off the radio and listened to NPR.

For the drive home, I listened on 40 meters but didn’t hear much on. So I switched to 20 meters, hit the tune button, and the antenna retuned itself for 20 meters. The first thing I heard was a loud signal, GR100MGY. From the G prefix I figured it was England, but that is a strange call so it sounded like something special. He also was working split — transmitting on one frequency and listening up 2 or 3 Khz. So I set up for split while driving 70 miles per hour — I turned the RIT on the radio to -2.50 kHz and tuned up until I heard the station. I knew I was transmitting up 2.5, but had no idea who else was up 2.5 calling him. So I started throwing out my call, and after about 10 tries I worked him. That’s neat to bust a pileup running mobile.

Then I tuned up the band a little, I didn’t hear much, so I called CQ. I was answered by WP4L. I knew that was Puerto Rico, and actually had a nice QSO with Angleo.

After that I tuned around a little and heard a faint CQ froom G0KDJ. I thought “why not try” and answered his call and worked Jim in Liverpool, England. So I worked three DX stations on the way home. Not a bad day.

When I got home I looked up GR100MGY. It was a special event station marking the 100th anniversary of the voyage of the Titanic. It was only going to be on 5 days, and had just gone on the air that day. Hence the pileup that I broke through.